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Suboxone Treatment

Suboxone

Naxolene is the added ingredient on a variation of subutex which is called suboxone. This is the normally given to patients. Its effects are the same as Subutex. Like subutex, it is used as a pain reliever and a medication drug in treating opioid addiction.

Suboxone
Suboxone

Effects of Suboxone

In determining the effects of suboxone to it’s users, numerous studies have been made. Suboxone tablets have been studied in 575 patients, Subutex tablets in 1834 patients and buprenorphine sublingual solutions in 2470 patients. A total of 1270 females have received buprenorphine in clinical trials. Dosing recommendations are based on statistics from one trial of both tablet formulations and two trials of the ethanolic solution. All trials used buprenorphine in conjunction with psychosocial counseling as component of a complete addiction treatment program. There have been no clinical studies conducted to review the effectiveness of buprenorphine as the only component of treatment.

In a double blind placebo and active controlled study, 326 heroin-addicted subjects were randomly assigned to either Suboxone 16 mg per day, 16 mg Subutex per day or placebo tablets. The primary study comparison was to assess the efficacy of Subutex and Suboxone individually alongside placebo. The fraction of thrice-weekly urine samples that were negative for non-study opioids was statistically higher for both Subutex and Suboxone, than for placebo.

What is Suboxone?

Since suboxone is a mixture of two presently marketed medications, buprenorphine and naloxone, it offers a combination of a weak narcotic (buprenorphine) and a narcotic antagonist (naloxone). The latter is supplemented to put off addicts from injecting the tablets intravenously, as has happened with tablets only containing buprenorphine; because it contains naloxone, Suboxone is very likely to generate intense withdrawal symptoms if misused intravenously by opioid-addicted individuals. Buprenorphine is a partial agonist at the mu-opioid receptor and an antagonist at the kappaopioid receptor. Naloxone is an antagonist at the mu-opioid receptor.

Like most addictions, suboxone or subutex addiction is quite unavoidable. The drug is not supposed to be used occasionally. It should be used as a continuous treatment method and thus, may become dangerous if usage is stopped too quickly. Like heroin, suboxone could result to a “euphoric” feeling. It cannot be denied that the person who is continuously taking the drug has a very high risk of becoming dependent and addicted to the drug. It has a mechanism that imitates the actions of naturally occurring pain-reducing chemicals called endorphins. Endorphins are found in the brain and spinal cord and decrease pain by combining with opioid receptors. However, opioids also act in the brain to cause feelings of euphoria and hallucinations. This very much illustrates their addictive inclination among people who are taking them in a long-term basis.

Moreover, in taking in suboxone, one should be very careful. As much as possible this should be taken with great regulation by a medical expert. This medicine may cause drowsiness. If affected, do not drive or operate machinery. Drowsiness will be made worse by alcohol, tranquilizers, sedatives and sleeping tablets such as benzodiazepines. Taking these in mixture with buprenorphine can also cause potentially dangerous problems with breathing and so should be avoided while taking this medicine. The liver function should be frequently monitored while receiving treatment with this medicine.

Supervision and Monitoring is Recommended

In substance addiction, it is very excellent to use drugs such as subutex and suboxone. However, there has not at all been a substance that has been found to be an effective medication for addiction that is at the same time non-addictive. Science may have been in the route of trying to find the perfect drug that would provide us with the two benefits.

Substances, therefore, must be taken with caution and appropriate supervision from medical professionals. In addition, it is the liability of the person himself to look after his in-take of a drug. He should be the one controlling the drug, not the other way around.

See our special report “Crystal Meth Treatment“.

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Crystal Meth Educational Video

crystal meth educational video

Educational Crystal Meth video and transcript published with permission from Hopelinks

What is Crystal Meth?

Crystal meth is short for crystal methamphetamine. It is just one form of the drug methamphetamine.  There are 5 00,000 Meth users in the United States. Methamphetamine was created in 1887 for scientific reasons and was first used in pill form during WWII by soldiers to stay awake on long missions. Crystal Meth is commonly made from re-crystallizing the powder methamphetamine using a liquid solvent, creating the clear crystals.

How is it used?

Forms of amphetamine are inhaled, crushed and snorted, injected, or orally ingested.

What are the signs of use?

Clear signs of someone under the influence: foregoing food and sleep, decreased appetite, increased activity, wakefulness, increased attention, decreased fatigue, hyperthermia, rapid and irregular heartbeat. Prolonged Use can result in: anxiety, confusion, insomnia, mood disturbances, violent behavior, paranoia, hallucinations, delusions

Medical detoxification is not needed however psychological detoxification is vital.

What are some of the withdrawal symptoms?

Some withdrawal symptoms include: depression, anxiety, intense cravings, and extreme fatigue.

Meth Addicts Can Recover

There are options for the treatment of meth that include various levels of treatment ranging from outpatient to in-hospital care. This is determined by the needs of each individual.

It is also encouraged for the meth addict to participate in 12 Step or abstinence based fellowships and support groups such as Narcotics Anonymous

If you or a loved one is caught up in crystal meth use call our hotline and get answers and guidance today.  Phones are answered by trained specialists 24/7 and the call is free.  Call now 877-794-9934

Learn more about treatment options from our special report Crystal Meth Treatment.

References

STREET DRUGS: a drug identification guide 2010
National Institute on Drug Abuse:
http://www.drugabuse.gov/

Medline Plus:
http://nih.gov/

The Vaults of Erowid:
http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/amphetamines/amphetamines.shtml
http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/meth/meth.shtml

Project Know:
http://www.projectknow.com/research/methamphetamine/

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Methamphetamine Crystal

Crystal Meth

One kind of psycho-stimulant drug that can give negative effects on the body once dependence sets in is methamphetamine crystal. Crytal meth as it is often called is composed of chemicals such as n-methyl-1-phenyl-propan-2-amine. It is in crystal form, hence the name. It has an odorless and colorless characteristic. It can be of any size that that can look like a piece of rock. Methamphetamine crystal is a purer form of n-methyl-1-phenyl-propan-2-amine. This purer form produces more lasting and more intense effects on the body as compared to its other forms.

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